‘BACK IN CONTROL’

Treat yourself to a Healthy Spine

It is a requirement by law (under the 1992 Health & Safety Regulation) that companies provide a work-station/ergonomic assessment for their employees.

Our assessment is designed to increase awareness in how to use the workplace to prevent bad postural habits.

The participant will learn a better understanding of themselves and the habits that they are unaware of, to the benefit of their health.

The assessment will include:

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  • Looking at an employee’s workstation and making changes where necessary
  • Providing a report with recommendation and advice
  • Discussion on ways in which the spine is likely to become abnormal, damaged and painful in the general course of the day at work
  • Discussion on ways in which to avoid these problems through being aware of posture, positioning and correct use of the workstation
  • Discussion on how to keep a healthy back through activity outside of the working environment

We have a Physiotherapist with a special interest in work related injuries and ergonomics. She is an IOSH (Institute of Occupational Health & Safety) recognised workstation assessor with extensive experience in work place display screen equipment assessment. Additionally she has experience and a wide knowledge of appropriate furniture and accessories through working as a medical consultant for an ergonomic furniture supplier.

Common basic habits such as carrying heavy briefcases on one side, holding the phone between the shoulder and the ear, crossing legs, standing on one hip are highlighted and we emphasise the need to make a change in all aspect of daily living, not just in the work environment.

Simple guidelines for good ergonomics at work:

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  • Place your monitor directly in front of you rather than off to one side
  • Have the keyboard at a comfortable height to reach with bent elbows
  • Then set appropriate chair at correct height
  • Use a foot, hand and mouse rest
  • Learn to be ambidextrous with the mouse
  • Take regular breaks and stretch
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